Gifts For Homesteaders (in 2019)
 

From tools and gadgets to hand-cranked kitchen appliances, practical work attire to lovely items to have around the home, the homesteader’s aesthetic combines old ways and useful items, and if you can blend beauty into that combo - even better!

Below is an exhaustive list of ideas for the homesteader in your life. We’ve made every effort to include a variety of items and price points to fit every budget.

If you want even more ideas, click over to our Homesteading Essentials page. You might even find something you like for your own home ;)

Happy homestead gifting!


Your homesteader friend likely knows the value of heirloom seeds versus the hybrid seeds which are alarmingly becoming more commonplace today.

Whether you want to use these to grow a bountiful garden now or save them in case of disaster, having a survival seed bank is a necessity for anyone hoping to grow food for their family or feed themselves if food supply chains were ever to go down.


Because everyone wants to know what walks through the woods at night, but especially homesteaders.

What’s been killing your chickens? What’s making that crazy sound in the middle of the night? What kind of wildlife are passing through so you can plan for hunting season? Trail cams answer all of these questions, plus it’s just exciting to capture images of wildlife in their natural habitat.

Pair this with a high-quality sea salt block and you’ll get glimpses of all kinds of critters, small and large!


This is a gift that every homesteader will appreciate. Garden tools are forever useful.

Nowadays, the tools you buy at big box stores like Lowe’s and Home Depot are often cheaply manufactured and end up breaking when you get gritty with them.

This set is steel-forged making them heavy duty and enduring.

Set comes with stainless steel multi-tool, trowel, and fork.


Modern candles have been found to infuse the air of your home with artificial fragrances and chemical waxes that actually increase the air pollution inside your home.

Some wicks even contain traces of lead, and lead heated up emits toxic fumes. Craziness!

Pure beeswax candles not only burn longer but they actually purify the air inside your home.

Personally, I keep an entire drawer full of beeswax candles, and most homesteaders I know do the same.


Visiting a friend —who is very intelligent and health conscious-- a couple of years ago, I learned that conventional crock pots have been found to infuse lead into the food!

Heavy metal toxicity is a real problem and can have devastating health impacts, “so what’s the solution?!” I asked her.

Clay crock pots are the solution. Humans have been cooking from clay pots for thousands of years and this seems to be the best way still.


We homestead-y types like to show off our pantry.

From bulk herbs and grains and other dried goods to the wild edibles we harvested ourselves and can’t wait to treat our visitors to.

If you ask us, there is just nothing more pleasing and beautiful than shelves of clear containers, full to the brim of healthy nourishment from the earth.


Socks have been the fallback gift of not knowing what to get someone for a long time. But if you gift your homesteader friend these socks, it’s a whole different story.

These extra heavy SmartWool socks are my favorite sock to work in, hike, or anything that requires a lot of standing and moving.

I bought these last year after a 6-mile hike through the rainforest left my ankles blistered. I limped into the outdoor apparel store looking for the thickest barrier I could find to put between my ankle and my boot. These provided so much comfort and relief that I’ve since stocked up and these are, hands down, my favorite sock.


Looking to really treat the homesteader in your life?

A sawmill is a homestead investment that just keeps on giving. Being able to mill your own lumber is invaluable. But sawmills cost tens of thousands of dollars and simply aren’t in the budget for most.

Alaskan Chainsaw Mills are the solution! With a few turns of the wrench, these mills mount to a chainsaw allowing for the milling of high-quality lumber!

If your friend doesn’t have one, we can almost guarantee they want one.


One can never have too many blankets folded and available around the home.

Practical and cozy, these heavy-woven blankets are made from cotton that was grown without the use of herbicides or pesticides. (Did you know that the cotton industry is responsible for most of the pesticides used in America?! - not cozy).

Available in an array of lovely earthy tones.


I can’t even count how many years I’ve had my LED lantern (kept beside the bed), and it still burns just as bright as it always has.

Whether the power goes out and you need a strong and reliable light source, or you need to run outside in the dark to check on your animals… this is the lantern you can really count on.

Plus, the red design gives it a charming old-fashioned look :)


Traditional dinner bells add an old world charm to the homestead, and come in very useful when everyone is scattered about and the meal is ready.

This one is a fantastic price and I can’t imagine any homesteader not enjoying it.


The water filter of choice for most homesteaders, especially off-grid folks.

These countertop water filters are known to be some of the highest quality filters you can get your hands on.

They’re gravity-fed, requiring no power, just pour the water in and let time do it’s thing.

Berkey is even purported to remove fluoride from water, so these are a good addition to any health-conscious kitchen even to filter tap water through.


This handy dandy vintage glass butter churn allows you to make butter at home in under 10 minutes!

Just add heavy cream and start churning. It’s a good activity for kids, too, and adds rustic charm to any kitchen.

Kilner is a reputable brand dating back to the 1800’s so you can trust the quality.


If your homesteader friend has a woodstove or other indoor fireplace, this is an ideal gift! Firewood continuoussly has to be brought indoors and if you use your arms to carry a bundle in, you inevitably end up with bits of wood on your clothing and on the floor.

This canvas bag takes care of those dilemmas and looks good doing it!


Humans have been using clay cookware for thousands of years and it’s still the safest way to cook.

Aluminum and stick-free modern cookware have been found to release toxic chemicals into the food we eat, so clay is the healthiest route to take, and I think it adds a lovely aesthetic to the kitchen!

This black clay stew pot is just one of many items Ancient Cookware offers, so be sure to check out their full store.


Nearly every homesteader grows their own food in the form of a garden, but did you know that sprouts are one of the most potent sources of nutrition you can get!?

(Check out my post about growing broccoli sprouts in one of these little hemp sprout bags and the huge array of health benefits they offer).

So a great gift for your homesteading buddy would be a sprout bag like this and maybe even some sprouting seeds. Maybe you’ll even introduce them to something they didn’t yet know about!


So these are some ideas to get you started but the fun does not stop there ~ click on over to our Homestead Essentials page for a whole smorgasbord of gift ideas —>

 

Welcome!

Tiffany Davidson Eric Smith Off Grid Homesteading in washington State

My husband and I are working to build a Nordic-inspired homestead in the Washington wilderness slowly with cash and no debt. You can follow the journey here!

I write about:

  • wilderness living

  • our homestead journey

  • health & wellness

  • adventure travel

  • cozy homemaking

  • wild food foraging

  • DIY & craft projects

  • making a living online from home (or anywhere)

  • natural living

  • my own recipes from scratch

  • and much more


My hope is that you will find some nugget of inspiration here.
Thank you so much for stopping in & please come back often. The kettle's always on...

x Tiffany



INSTAGRAM:


Disclosure: This website uses affiliate links, meaning: at no additional cost to you, we earn a small commission if you click-through and make a purchase. We only feature products that we believe in and use ourselves. Your support means the world to us and allows us to host this website.
So thank you :)


You might also enjoy:


An Unexpected Turning of Tides
 

I have become wary of laying out plans for the future, because not only do people hold you to those plans, and the plans rarely go as planned, but setting expectations also creates room for disappointments.

So I’m learning more and more to have a loose idea, but to expect inevitable variations to occur.

Life is forever evolving, and often is not so straightforward as to abide by our mathematical planning on calendars and calculators.

Tiffany Davidson Homesteading Blog Washington State

Tiffany Davidson Eric Smith Washington State Homesteading Blog Travel Blog

We were moving along at full speed, making money, putting it back to prepare for a cabin build in Spring of 2019 on our new land.

Last Autumn, we arranged for a vacation to surprise loved ones in Kentucky for the holidays. Eric arranged work in KY, and his employer here in northeast WA had no problem with him leaving for this time, promising not only would his job be here when we returned, but that they would provide winter training since we’d be arriving back in the dead of winter (Eric’s route is, WAS, through the mountains of northeast WA and British Columbia, with plenty of steep mountain grades - terrifying in a car, let alone a huge semi truck hauling 100,000+ pounds).

We arrived back to our home in WA in mid-January, Eric set out to work as scheduled, despite that commute being 1.5 hours one way, through icy mountain roads, it was the price we were paying to live in this wilderness we so love.

Work went as planned for a couple of days, then as a winter storm fell over the area and mountain passes became treacherous, Eric reached out to his managers to schedule the day of winter training he was promised.

One manager speedily rushed him through a tutorial of putting chains on the truck, in the parking lot, amidst a blizzard, and the chains ended up being on backwards(!) and they claimed this was winter training.

Tiffany Davidson Washington State Photography

The disappointment set in and now we were in a pickle. NO way was he going to drive without winter training, not only to protect his own life, but the lives of others out on those roads.

Days went by where he was loosely made to believe that he would get training at some point, until eventually his managers turned condescending and unprofessional, all the while we were in a bit of a panic because Eric’s paycheck was suddenly… not happening as expected. With every week that went by, thousands of unmade dollars also went by, and the pressure was on for me to take on more clients to keep us afloat so that we wouldn’t have to tap into our emergency savings.

When Eric persisted with his employers, asking: “why not just send ____ with me as promised, for ONE day of winter training, and we can all move on as planned…?” the response given was that they “didn’t want to endanger TWO lives!” — so you can imagine the frustration of all of this. We live in a place where going out and simply getting a new job isn’t exactly… realistic. So there we were, our second income just completely removed from the equation, in the middle of a snowy icy winter, totally unsure what the next best move was.

Tiffany Davidson Washingtons Last Frontier Homesteading Blog Rural Living Photography

I’ll save you the details of weeks of despairing and worrying and thinking and more plans-that-didnt-go-as-expected and the decision had to be made…

The decision to move.

I can’t tell you how difficult it was to decide this and to set our jaws about it.

All of our efforts for the past couple of years have been to get to this place, this northeast WA wilderness, and be able to live comfortably in it.

What a sobering realization that: we still are not ready.

Tiffany Davidson Washington State Photographer Homesteading Blog

To live a good life in this land, it seems you must either be born here, marry into a family who was born here, be very wealthy, retired, or getting some kind of regular check that does not rely on the local economy.

Or you can work online, which is the route I have taken, but Eric is still reliant upon the local marketplace for his income.

Tiffany Davidson Washington State Photographer Homesteading Blog
Tiffany Davidson Washington State Photographer HOmesteading Blog

So we have moved!

The place we’ve chosen to move to is a place that stole our hearts last year when we visited, and it’s a place that - despite being much more populated than the northeast portion of the state - still retains a rugged and remote feeling (especially on the western side).

We are living on the Olympic Peninsula, and we have every intention to enjoy this place wholeheartedly for the myriad of natural wonders it has to offer.

Tiffany Davidson Washington State Photographer Homesteading Blog Olympic Peninsula
Tiffany Davidson Olympic Peninsula Photographer

What about our homestead plans in northeast WA?

They remain. But they have been slowed down.

This year, we hope to achieve a fenced-in garden area and to get a dowser out to the property to check for water availability so that a well can be dug. Maybe more will get accomplished than that, but those are our goals for 2019 on the property.

Just a few months ago, our goal was to have a cabin built on the property in 2019, but that can no longer happen.

Building a homestead from scratch with cash takes time. And it takes being closeby. So our plans are definitely delayed.

But who knows what the future holds. I have a lot of projects underway, and in my line of work it’s sometimes difficult to predict the payoff amount and timeline. So perhaps the homestead development will move faster than we could possibly foresee at this moment.

Like I mentioned at the beginning of this post, I’m learning that for my own life, loose ideas work better than concrete plans.

So this is a surrender of sorts, and a letting go and letting life unfold as it does.

Tiffany Davidson Olympic Peninsula Photographer Homesteading Blog

I’m certain that in a few years, I will read back over this post and smile to myself, having never could’ve imagined the way that things ended up unfolding. And that awareness brings me a certain sense of relief and humor :)

“How wild it was, to let it be…”

Tiffany Davidson Travel Photographer Olympic Peninsula Homesteading Blog
 

Welcome!

Tiffany Davidson.JPG

My husband and I are working to build a Nordic-inspired homestead in the Washington wilderness slowly with cash and no debt. You can follow the journey here!

I write about:

  • wilderness living

  • our homestead journey

  • health & wellness

  • adventure travel

  • cozy homemaking

  • wild food foraging

  • DIY & craft projects

  • making a living online from home (or anywhere)

  • natural living

  • my own recipes from scratch

  • and much more


My hope is that you will find some nugget of inspiration here.
Thank you so much for stopping in & please come back often. The kettle's always on...

x Tiffany


INSTAGRAM:


Disclosure: This website uses affiliate links, meaning: at no additional cost to you, we earn a small commission if you click-through and make a purchase. We only feature products that we believe in and use ourselves. Your support means the world to us and allows us to host this website.
So thank you :)


You might also enjoy…

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My 10 Favorite Cookbooks [Interesting Cookbooks: From Scottish to Nordic, Vegan To Paleo, & Everything In Between] (2019)
 
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It was around the year 2010 when I started getting into special diets.

Back then, it started simply with the Gerson Therapy (no, I wasn’t ill, just… bored, I suppose?) and I vaguely recall waking in the middle of the night shaking uncontrollably - likely because of removing all salt from my diet. Next, was plain vegetarianism, but with more of a homecooked flair (not the Boca burgers and Beanee Weanees from my college days). Then, living in a Zen monastery in northern Kentucky, I dove into raw veganism. Breakfast was something like a mango covered in maple syrup, a handful of blueberries, and maybe an avocado. It went well for quite a while until my blood sugar got WAY out of whack from eating too many sugars - natural or not - and nothing very substantial. I remember talking on the phone with my dad one day, shaky, weak, and feeling like I constantly had to eat something, and he laughingly recommended I go get myself a grill and “throw a big steak on there.” Full of guilt, I was so desperate that I actually took his advice and apprehensively made myself a tiny steak that evening.

Some years later, I maintained a keto/Paleo kind of diet for many years with decent results (but frankly probably too much protein).
More recently, I experimented with a whole plant foods diet, and then a Chinese Medicine diet on the recommendation of my acupuncturist.

Now at this stage in life, I find myself done with diets. Instead - I just eat real whole foods, and a variety of those.
What does that look like? Fish, eggs, veggies, fruits, grass-fed butter and ghee, raw grass-fed dairy products, sourdough breads, quality olive oil, oats, beans, nuts and seeds, wild game meats like venison and turkey, some grass-fed red meat from time to time, plentiful amounts of herbs and spices (turmeric on everything!), fermented foods like sauerkraut and kombucha, good clean filtered water, lots of herbal teas, and coffee roasted just down the road from here.

I love learning about what my Scottish and Scandinavian ancestors ate traditionally. I love learning the seemingly lost arts of baking sourdough, of soaking my grains before I use them, and brewing kombucha, to name a few. My kitchen and my cooking now bring joy, rather than guilt or confusion or over-analysis.

I give you this context in advance because my collection of favorite cookbooks is sure to be a miscellany. With the prevalence of diet culture; I know many people want a list of strictly this or that type of cookbook, but I hope you’ll find something that tickles your fancy.


“This well-researched, thought-provoking guide to traditional foods contains a startling message: Animal fats and cholesterol are not villains but vital factors in the diet, necessary for normal growth, proper function of the brain and nervous system, protection from disease and optimum energy levels. Sally Fallon dispels the myths of the current low-fat fad in this practical, entertaining guide to a can-do diet that is both nutritious and delicious.

Nourishing Traditions will tell you:

  1. Why your body needs old fashioned animal fats

  1. Why butter is a health food

  1. How high-cholesterol diets promote good health

  1. How saturated fats protect the heart

  1. How rich sauces help you digest and assimilate your food

  1. Why grains and legumes need special preparation to provide optimum benefits

  1. About enzyme-enhanced food and beverages that can provide increased energy and vitality

  1. Why high-fiber, lowfat diets can cause vitamin and mineral deficiencies

Topics include the health benefits of traditional fats and oils (including butter and coconut oil); dangers of vegetarianism; problems with modern soy foods; health benefits of sauces and gravies; proper preparation of whole grain products; pros and cons of milk consumption; easy-to-prepare enzyme enriched condiments and beverages; and appropriate diets for babies and children.”


“Dr. Michael Greger’s first traditionally published book, How Not to Die, presented the scientific evidence behind the only diet that can prevent and reverse many of the causes of premature death and disability. Now, The How Not to Die Cookbook puts that science into action. From Superfood Breakfast Bites to Spaghetti Squash Puttanesca to Two-Berry Pie with Pecan-Sunflower Crust, every recipe in The How Not to Die Cookbook offers a delectable, easy-to-prepare, plant-based dish to help anyone eat their way to better health.”





My husband purchased a signed copy of this cookbook for me from a bookstore in Homer, Alaska. The cornbread recipe is so SO perfect.

“Eve and Eivin Kilcher, stars of the hit Discovery show Alaska: The Last Frontier, are experts in sustainable living. Homesteaders by choice, the couple has had to use their self-reliance skills to survive harsh winters in the Alaskan wilderness and raise a thriving family. In their debut book, the Kilchers share 85 original family recipes and advice on gardening, preserving, and foraging. The tips and techniques they have cultivated from their family and through necessity will help anyone looking to shrink their environmental footprint and become less dependent on mass-produced food and products. Stunningly photographed in and around their handmade home and farm, Homestead Kitchen illustrates that taking on small-scale sustainable projects is not only possible in a suburban/urban setting, but ultimately a more responsible and gratifying way to live.”


“The traditional foods movement is a fad-free approach to cooking and eating that emphasizes nutrient-dense, real food, and values quality, environment, and community over the convenience of processed, additive-laden products that are the norm on grocery store shelves. 
     Based on the research of Weston A. Price, who studied the diets of indigenous peoples to understand the relationship between nutrition and health, a traditional foods diet avoids processed ingredients, but allows meat, animal fat, and grains. It embraces cultured dairy, such as kefir and yogurt, that contain beneficial bacteria; fermented foods, such as sauerkraut and kombucha, that are rich in probiotics; and organ meats that are packed with vitamins and minerals. It also celebrates locally grown foods. By choosing ingredients from nearby sources, you create a stronger connection to your food, and have a better understanding what you’re eating and how it was produced. 
     In The Nourished Kitchen, Jennifer McGruther guides you through her traditional foods kitchen and offers more than 160 recipes inspired by  the seasons, land, and waters around her. In the morning, fuel up with Eggs Poached in Fiery Tomato Sauce. On a hot summer day, Cucumber Salad with Dill and Kefir is a cooling side dish, and on a chilly fall evening, Barley in Broth with Bacon and Kale offers comfort and warmth. Old-Fashioned Meat Loaf with Gravy makes a hearty family meal, while Chicken in Riesling with Peas can be the centerpiece of an elegant supper. Satisfy your sweet tooth with Maple-Roasted Pears, and quench your thirst with naturally fermented Vanilla Mint Soda. With the benefit of Jennifer’s experience, you can craft a loaf of Whole Wheat and Spelt Sourdough Bread and stock your kitchen with Spiced Sour Pickles with Garlic.
     The Nourished Kitchen not only teaches how to prepare wholesome, nourishing foods, but also encourages a mindful approach cooking and a celebration of old-world culinary traditions that have sustained healthy people for millennia. Whether you’re already a practitioner of the traditional foods lifestyle or simply trying to incorporate more natural, highly nutritious foods into your routine, you will find plenty to savor in The Nourished Kitchen.”


The Nordic Cookbook

Initially, I bought this cookbook for the inspiring photography and culinary history of Scandinavia. Then, a friend recommended I watch an episode of Chef’s Table with Swedish chef Magnus Nilsson, and now I find myself utterly enchanted and drawn into Mr. Nilsson’s remote Swedish world.

The Nordic Cookbook, richly illustrated with the personal photography of internationally acclaimed chef Magnus Nilsson, unravels the mysteries of Nordic ingredients and introduces the region's culinary history and cooking techniques.

Included in this beautiful book are more than 700 authentic recipes Magnus collected while travelling extensively throughout the Nordic countries – Denmark, the Faroe Islands, Finland, Greenland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden – enhanced by atmospheric photographs of its landscapes and people. His beautiful photographs feature in the book alongside images of the finished dishes by Erik Olsson, the photographer behind Fäviken.

With Magnus as a guide, everyone can prepare classic Nordic dishes and also explore new ones.The Nordic Cookbook introduces readers to the familiar (gravlax, meatballs and lingonberry jam) and the lesser-known aspects of Nordic cuisine (rose-hip soup, pork roasted with prunes, and juniper beer).

Organized by food type, The Nordic Cookbook covers every type of Nordic dish including meat, fish, vegetables, breads, pastries and desserts. These recipes are achievable for home cooks of all abilities and are accompanied by narrative texts on Nordic culinary history, ingredients and techniques including smoking and home preserving. Additional essays explore classic dishes made for special occasions and key seasonal events, such as the Midsummer feast.”

The most comprehensive source on homecooking from the Nordic countries.


Fäviken 

Also by Magnus Nilsson, this book offers exclusive insight into Nilsson’s restaurant, Fäviken Magasinet, in remote Sweden.

“Fäviken is an exclusive insight into one of the world's most interesting restaurants: Fäviken Magasinet in Sweden. Narrative texts, photographs and recipes explain head chef Magnus Nilsson's remarkable approach to sourcing and cooking with ingredients that are farmed and hunted in the immediate vicinity of the restaurant, and how he creates a seasonal cycle of menus based on them. He runs the restaurant with the same ethos as the farm that the restaurant building once housed. The small team of chefs harvests and preserves all the food for the restaurant by hand using the most natural methods possible. They reject the popular contemporary cooking equipment such as low-temperature water baths and liquid nitrogen in favour of simple cooking methods of grilling and roasting over open coals, relying on the chefs' innate skills and knowledge of the product to get the perfect result. This approach results in the highly creative food they serve in the restaurant, the pure, intense flavours of which, far from seeming traditional, are remarkable.

The restaurant is near Järpen, 600km north of Stockholm, in a remote part of the country, an area popular with cross-country skiiers. The restaurant is in a traditional Swedish farm and caters for only 12 people each evening. The menu is the same for all the guests, and each dish is served to all the guests at the same time, introduced by Magnus himself. The dishes sometimes involve the use of traditional implements such as a nineteenth-century ice-cream churn or an old sourdough bread basket, which is still used for proving the dough.

Even though not everyone can visit Fäviken, Nilsson's approach to working with ingredients in the most natural, intuitive way possible, and making the most of each season, will inspire all cooks and food-lovers to think differently about the ingredients that are available to them. Many of the basic recipes for yoghurt, bread, porridge, vinegar, pickles and preserves are simple and straightforward enough for anyone to attempt at home, and the advice on natural preservation methods can be followed by anyone.

The texts will provide inspiration for chefs and food lovers all over the world and are fully accessible to the general reader.”


”At Noma—four times named the world’s best restaurant—every dish includes some form of fermentation, whether it’s a bright hit of vinegar, a deeply savory miso, an electrifying drop of garum, or the sweet intensity of black garlic. Fermentation is one of the foundations behind Noma’s extraordinary flavor profiles.

Now René Redzepi, chef and co-owner of Noma, and David Zilber, the chef who runs the restaurant’s acclaimed fermentation lab, share never-before-revealed techniques to creating Noma’s extensive pantry of ferments. And they do so with a book conceived specifically to share their knowledge and techniques with home cooks. With more than 500 step-by-step photographs and illustrations, and with every recipe approachably written and meticulously tested, The Noma Guide to Fermentation takes readers far beyond the typical kimchi and sauerkraut to include koji, kombuchas, shoyus, misos, lacto-ferments, vinegars, garums, and black fruits and vegetables. And—perhaps even more important—it shows how to use these game-changing pantry ingredients in more than 100 original recipes.

Fermentation is already building as the most significant new direction in food (and health). With The Noma Guide to Fermentation, it’s about to be taken to a whole new level.”


“This is the first new edition of The Scots Kitchen for over thirty years. Beautifully laid out for a new generation of readers and with charming line illustrations by Ian Macintosh, it is introduced by the well-known cookery writer and broadcaster, Catherine Brown. She describes the impact this pioneering book has had on the whole of Scottish cuisine and traces the fascinating life story of Marian McNeill herself. Notes explain how to use the book so that its treasure trove of recipes can be explored in the modern kitchen. As well as being a practical guide to all aspects of Scottish cooking, this is above all a book to be read for pleasure, to refer to and savour again and again.”


Catherine Brown's classic book charts the history of cooking and food in Scotland from the late 17th century to the present day, with over 650 recipes. Chapters such as The Simplicity of 1690 Cooking, The Highland Table of 1715, The Edinburgh Tavern eating of 1786, Historic Orkney of 1988, and others offer an exciting look at the evolution of Scottish foods and cooking principles.

A wonderful book for anyone, but especially those of us with Scottish ancestry to get a look at how our ancestors lived and ate.


I was intrigued by Francis Mallmann when I saw him on Chef’s Table, charring foods over fires in remote Patagonia.

“Elemental, fundamental, and delicious” is how Anthony Bourdain describes the trailblazing live-fire cooking of Francis Mallmann. The New York Times called Mallmann’s first book, Seven Fires, “captivating” and “inspiring.” And now, in Mallmann on Fire, the passionate master of the Argentine grill takes us grilling in magical places—in winter’s snow, on mountaintops, on the beach, on the crowded streets of Manhattan, on a deserted island in Patagonia, in Paris, Brooklyn, Bolinas, Brazil—each locale inspiring new discoveries as revealed in 100 recipes for meals both intimate and outsized. We encounter legs of lamb and chicken hung from strings, coal-roasted delicata squash, roasted herbs, a parrillada of many fish, and all sorts of griddled and charred meats, vegetables, and fruits, plus rustic desserts cooked on the chapa and baked in wood-fired ovens. At every stop along the way there is something delicious to eat and a lesson to be learned about slowing down and enjoying the process, not just the result.”


Please - leave me some of your favorite cookbooks in the comments below!


 

Welcome!

Tiffany Davidson.JPG

My husband and I are working to build a Nordic-inspired homestead in the Washington wilderness slowly with cash and no debt. You can follow the journey here!

I write about:

  • wilderness living

  • our homestead journey

  • health & wellness

  • adventure travel

  • cozy homemaking

  • wild food foraging

  • DIY & craft projects

  • making a living online from home (or anywhere)

  • natural living

  • my own recipes from scratch

  • and much more


My hope is that you will find some nugget of inspiration here.
Thank you so much for stopping in & please come back often. The kettle's always on...

x Tiffany


INSTAGRAM:


Disclosure: This website uses affiliate links, meaning: at no additional cost to you, we earn a small commission if you click-through and make a purchase. We only feature products that we believe in and use ourselves. Your support means the world to us and allows us to host this website.
So thank you :)


You might also enjoy:

Ikarian Longevity Stew [Blue Zone Recipe]
 

People near or over the age of 100 walking several miles a day, without use of a cane, dancing until the wee hours of the morning with friends, continuing to work, and make love?

Is this the stuff of dreams? Au contraire - this is the way of life for many folks in the world’s “blue zones” - a term coined by Dan Buettner and expanded upon in his book (which I highly recommend reading).

Dan explores the factors that seem to contribute to these long, healthy, fulfilling lives and gleans what lifestyle habits we could integrate into our own lives.

One factor is, of course, diet. And here is my spin on a stew that robust Ikarians have been consuming for years - tasty and simple to make. Enjoy in a relaxed, stress-free state of mind, with friends, or after a long walk to add years to your life, and life to your years.

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Ikarian Longevity Stew

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups red kidney beans (cooked)

  • 1/4 c extra virgin olive oil

  • 1 yellow onion, diced

  • 1 fennel bulb, julienned

  • 2 cloves of garlic, minced

  • 2 carrots, diced

  • 1 BPA-free can of diced tomatoes

  • 1 BPA-free can of tomato paste

  • 2 bay leaves

  • 1 teaspoon sea salt

  • 2 handfuls of kale

  • 1 bunch fresh dill, chopped

Instructions:

  1. In a Dutch oven (I use this one), add the olive oil and bring to medium heat.

  2. Add onion, fennel, and garlic and saute until tender and fragrant (about 4 -5 minutes).

  3. Add kidney beans, carrots, diced tomatoes, tomato paste, and bay leaves to the pot. Add just enough water to cover all ingredients, and raise the heat to bring to a boil.

  4. Cover, reduce the heat to low, and simmer for about 20-30 minutes (or until carrots are tender), stirring occasionally.

  5. Stir in kale, dill, and sea salt. Cover and cook another 5-10 minutes.

  6. Remove bay leaves, ladle into bowls, drizzle with olive oil, and enjoy!

[Adapted from: Dan Buettner’s Ikarian Stew]

 

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Welcome!


Tiffany Davidson Washingtons Last Frontier Off Grid Homesteading Blogs

My husband and I are working to build a Nordic-inspired homestead in the Washington wilderness slowly with cash and no debt. You can follow the journey here!

I write about:

  • wilderness living

  • our homestead journey

  • health & wellness

  • adventure travel

  • cozy homemaking

  • wild food foraging

  • DIY & craft projects

  • making a living online from home (or anywhere)

  • natural living

  • my own recipes from scratch

  • and much more


My hope is that you will find some nugget of inspiration here.
Thank you so much for stopping in & please come back often. The kettle's always on...

x Tiffany

INSTAGRAM:

Disclosure: This website uses affiliate links, meaning: at no additional cost to you, we earn a small commission if you click-through and make a purchase. We only feature products that we believe in and use ourselves. Your support means the world to us and allows us to host this website.
So thank you :)

My Delicious & Healthy Homemade Cereal Recipe [Grain Free, Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Vegan & Paleo]
 
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I love cereal.

The two most attractive factors for me are the ease of preparation and the delicious taste.

But even the “healthiest” of cereals on the shelves today are full of questionable ingredients.

So I decided to make my own!

And what I came to find out is that I should’ve been doing this all along.

Not only is this cereal recipe really, really, really tasty, but it’s a breeze to make.

Pro tip: Double or triple this recipe to make a big batch for a week or two of readymade healthy cereal.

Most of all, enjoy each bowl of deliciousness knowing you’re putting only nutritious whole foods into your body!


My —Grain Free, Gluten Free, Sugar Free, Vegan, Paleo, Whole Foods, Etc. Etc Etc. — Homemade Healthy Breakfast Cereal:


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You will need:

Instructions:

  1. In a blender, combine: dates, cashews and hazelnuts and blend thoroughly but not into a fine meal consistency. Allow for some small chunks to remain for the sake of texture.

  2. Add the cacao nibs, dried blueberries or goji berries, and coconut. Blend again.

  3. Transfer mixture into a large bowl, add a pinch of sea salt and optional stevia, honey, or maple syrup.

  4. Mix well with a spoon, making sure dates are evenly distributed throughout.
    Enjoy a bowl now with your milk of choice and store the rest in the fridge :)

Yum! To our health!


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Welcome!


Tiffany Davidson Washingtons Last Frontier Off Grid Blog Homesteading Blog Wilderness Living Blog odern Homesteading Washington State

My husband and I are working to build a Nordic-inspired homestead in the Washington wilderness slowly with cash and no debt. You can follow the journey here!

I write about:

  • wilderness living

  • our homestead journey

  • health & wellness

  • adventure travel

  • cozy homemaking

  • wild food foraging

  • DIY & craft projects

  • making a living online from home (or anywhere)

  • natural living

  • my own recipes from scratch

  • and much more


My hope is that you will find some nugget of inspiration here.
Thank you so much for stopping in & please come back often. The kettle's always on...

x Tiffany


INSTAGRAM:

Disclosure: This website uses affiliate links, meaning: at no additional cost to you, we earn a small commission if you click-through and make a purchase. We only feature products that we believe in and use ourselves. Your support means the world to us and allows us to host this website.
So thank you :)


We Bought Land! [An Exciting Update On Our Journey To Building An Off-Grid Homestead From Scratch, Slowly & With Cash]
 
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Time moves slowly, and yet so fast.

It seems like we’ve been redesigning careers, working, saving money, and browsing properties for sale for an eternity, yet at the same time it feels like it was just yesterday that we even seriously set goals and began this journey to building an off-grid homestead from scratch.

If you follow this blog, you’ve watched as we setup completely new career paths, finally made the big move to this wilderness we love so dearly, and you know we’ve just been plugging away - working a lot and saving as much money as possible.

Now, a big step has been made in this overall process - WE BOUGHT LAND!

This is a big accomplishment and we’re so happy to finally meet and begin to get acquainted with the land we’ll build out our dream homestead on over the course of many years. Now we have a canvas for all of our imaginings to play out on and it’s such an exciting new dynamic!

I wanted to make a post here to document this pivotal moment and introduce you to our land.
In time, many more pictures will be shared, videos too I’m sure, so be sure to follow us on Instagram if you’re interested in a more intimate look into the process.

In early Spring, we’ll begin building a small cabin to live in, so this winter will be spent brainstorming, designing, and gathering materials. There’s a lot to learn and a lot to do and we’ll share what we glean with you as we go.


Welcome to our beautiful piece of the earth…

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Where is it?

Situated about one hour northeast of where we currently live is an area we fell in love with earlier this year - the Okanogan Highlands.
This area is desolate and beautiful, so very peaceful and inspiring. Once you emerge into the Highlands, it feels like you’re in a dream and like you’ve gone back in time simultaneously. Some combination of golden light on rolling highlands, the vast spaciousness, old abandoned pioneer cabins tucked in the landscape like a memory, the crisp cool air, the snow-capped Cascades far in the distance… all combine to create a place that we both feel is altogether unique and distinct from anywhere else we’ve ever been.

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How much land?

We purchased 20 acres, mostly wooded, with open area at the bottom.
Aspen trees line their way down the property spilling out into a grove at the bottom, pointing to the strong possibility of water being not too far below the surface, while the majority of the property is coated in Larches, Pines, Douglas Firs, and even a few Maple varieties.
We have already found fresh scat of black bear, elk, moose, coyotes, and a single cougar (who might even live on the property in a cave we’ve yet to explore, we’ll know more once we get a trail cam set up in January).
We’re also really looking forward to exploring the geology around the property…

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What will you do for water?

This will certainly involve a lot of trial and error.
We have a few different ideas in mind:
First - we are going to try to catch rainwater, despite the minute amounts of rainfall this area gets. We’ll see how it goes.
Second - we will likely try to dig a well if water is determined to be close enough to the surface. As mentioned above, the Aspen trees seem to be a good indicator that we do have water close to the surface.
Third - over time we will purchase cisterns, which we’ll bury, fill with water, and gravity-feed to the home and other areas as needed.
I plan to utilize permaculture strategies for growing food that create the need for less water, such as hügelkultur and other solutions.

 

What about electricity?

We plan to be off-grid, and will likely start off with just the essentials - a wood stove, oil lamps, and lots of beeswax candles.
Over time, as we save more money, we’ll begin to incorporate more substantial off-grid power systems such as wind and solar. Fortunately, our climate gets over 300 days a year of sunshine!

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How will you work online?

One of the reasons we ended up deciding on this property is because it’s in view of a rare satellite. The way Internet works out here is usually: if you have visible line of sight to a satellite (which are usually placed on high peaks), you can probably get Internet. Otherwise, it’s doubtful.
We shouldn’t run into an issue accessing Internet once we’ve built the necessary infrastructure for a company to come out. Of course, we’ll be without power for a while as we save to afford off-grid power setups. So, there will certainly be a transition period where I may have to find other Internet solutions for a while. (Another reason I’m working hard now to establish passive income!).

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When will you be living on the property?

Our plan is to begin building in early Spring (2019). We plan to build a small cabin - just 14x14 to begin with - which will eventually become an Airbnb one day after we finish our larger cabin.
We’re deriving inspiration from older Nordic home designs, but with modern touches (wooden cabin, painted black, big windows, large platform deck, etc.). Over time, we plan to build a sauna, several studios and work spaces, more small cabins for family to stay in… so we should end up with a proper Scandinavian village in the forest sort of feeling :)
(And you’ll be able to come stay and enjoy it yourself if you wish, thanks to the Airbnb platform).


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I hope these pictures and questions answered have been enjoyable to read or inspiring in some way on your own journey.

If you have any other questions, please feel free to leave them in the comments below!

And if you’re interested in this sort of thing, we hope you’ll subscribe to the blog and follow the journey as we build an off-grid homestead… from scratch… slowly… with cash!

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Until next time ~

x
Tiffany


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Welcome!


TIffany+Davidson+Washingtons+Last+Frontier+Wilderness+Living+Homesteading+Hygge+Blog+Inspiring+Beautiful+Blog+Life+in+Washington+Homesteading+Off+grid.png

My husband and I are working to build a Nordic-inspired homestead in the Washington wilderness slowly with cash and no debt. You can follow the journey here!

I write about:

  • wilderness living

  • our homestead journey

  • health & wellness

  • adventure travel

  • cozy homemaking

  • wild food foraging

  • DIY & craft projects

  • making a living online from home (or anywhere)

  • natural living

  • my own recipes from scratch

  • and much more


My hope is that you will find some nugget of inspiration here.
Thank you so much for stopping in & please come back often. The kettle's always on...

x Tiffany


Disclosure: This website uses affiliate links, meaning: at no additional cost to you, we earn a small commission if you click-through and make a purchase. We only feature products that we believe in and use ourselves. Your support means the world to us and allows us to host this website.
So thank you :)


YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY:

How To Begin Homesteading? Create Passive Income & Work Online! [3 Ideas That You Can Begin Now With No Money]
 
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Many of us in the homesteading community want to get out of the rat race, move to a rural area (or even the wilderness), grow our food, work on the homestead everyday, and enjoy a simpler way of life.

This is hard to do if you have to commute away from the homestead every day though. You never really get into that homestead state of mind when this is the case.

How to escape the rat race, then? How to wake up and be able to stay on the homestead, working on projects, enjoying our animals, nature, the land, the comfort of home, and our loved ones? That is the question so many of us feel daunted by.

We may get the acres, build the cabin, plant the garden… but, somehow it doesn’t feel complete when we have to leave every single day to go sell our time and get pulled back into that hectic state of mind that is the norm of modern Western industrial society.

We begin to believe it isn’t even possible and this is just the way it is nowadays.

I’m here to tell you that it is possible to earn a full-time income without having to leave your home(stead).

And no, you do not have to have some university-granted skill set to be able to do so. In fact, if you are truly motivated and driven to achieve this lifestyle, there is no reason you shouldn’t be able to achieve it in one year.

Just think - your life could be completely different this time one year from now. You could be working from home everyday or - even better - not working every day from anywhere, but generating passive income online instead! Freeing you to work on your homestead, on creative projects that are truly fulfilling, spending more time with those you love, and just enjoying a higher quality of life all around.

I know because I did (and am doing) it myself. So I wanted to share some personal advice if this sounds like a path you might be interested in taking yourself.

I’m going to share information about transitioning to working online from home followed by two passive income strategies - all that you can begin working on now!


Teach Yourself A Valuable In-Demand Online Skill So That You Can Work Online From Home or Anywhere


One way to go about this is to transition your career into an online work from home (or anywhere) position.

It doesn’t matter what you do right now for an income - you can 100% teach yourself a valuable skill so that you can work online and make a legitimate income. I know this is possible because I did it.

I taught myself how to design websites. I knew nothing about web design, knew no code, none of that - but I saw that it was in demand on a freelancing platform I was reading through and figured I’d give it a go. Fast forward one year and I’m making a full-time lucrative income as a web designer. The best part? I got paid to learn, rather than paying to learn.

But - this strategy does require drive and self-motivation. I worked full-time while listening to podcasts about self-educating and came home in the evenings and put in several hours designing my first website (for myself). I would’ve much rather gone for a hike or a walk on the bay, but I sat in front of the computer until bedtime. I was setting the foundation for a future I knew I wanted.

Over the months, I kept dabbling and learning and working on projects, then finally it all paid off and started to come together.

I created a profile on a freelancing platform, got my first client, and have not been without work since!

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The best part is that with every new job I take on, I learn new things (while getting paid) and my portfolio and skill sets continue to grow and grow.

Now I am able to live in a wilderness area with only three people per square mile (as we build a homestead from scratch) and make a full-time income from home (thank goodness for satellites!).


Here’s what I recommend you do: go to a freelancing platform like Fiverr or Upwork and read through the job listings. This will give you an idea of the type of work that’s in the highest demand as well as pay rates. This is the strategy I used to hone in on what I felt I could learn and provide as a service.

JavaScript developers were in high demand and at a very good price point, but I had tried to learn JavaScript before and found it very difficult, so I knew that wasn’t a realistic path for me. I settled on web design using a content management system that I had experience with already.

This isn’t to say that you can’t teach yourself to do something that right now seems impossible to you - in fact, most programmers out there in the world right now are self-taught. Many of them work everyday for big companies like Intel, getting paid six figures, and still feel like imposters. One of my close friends who is a self-taught senior software engineer still laughs and jokes that he essentially gets paid everyday to Google (meaning - he doesn’t know how to do something, so he just Googles until he finds the solution).

Freelancing platforms offer a variety of ideas: web design, writing, graphic design, voiceovers, audio work, etc. etc. Let’s use graphic design as an example - download Adobe Illustrator, go to YouTube and look for “Adobe Illustrator Tutorials” or “adobe illustrator logo design” and start doing these tutorials. Not only do you get experience, but by jumping in and working on actual projects like this, you’re building a portfolio that you can show clients later. Then, market yourself as a logo designer- ta da!


Now let’s talk about passive income.

What is passive income?
”Passive income is income resulting from cash flow received on a regular basis, requiring minimal to no effort by the recipient to maintain it.”

In a nutshell: you aren’t selling your time anymore. You get that most wonderful resource back!

BUT… passive income does require a lot of upfront work. Atleast the methods I’m familiar with do.

Guess what, though? If you get started right now, in one year you could have a substantial passive income stream flowing. Imagine the ways this could change your life - freeing your time for other endeavors and removing any need to be location dependent (or live near a populous).


Passive Income Idea #1: Write & Publish E-books


I believe that every human being has a story to tell or something to teach.

Think about what you know well that you could teach - a process, a skill or craft, a cookbook, a travel guide to your area, a natural history of a place you love, how to have a passionate marriage… really the possibilities are endless. Just get creative. (If you suspect you would go the non-fiction route, I recommend reading the book On Writing Well: The Classic Guide To Writing Non-Fiction).

Or - write a story rather than a guide. Maybe something similar to this: Go North Young Man: Modern Homesteading in Alaska which is just a man’s account of his first four years as a homesteader on Alaska’s Kenai Peninsula in the 1950’s.

Write what you know. Figure out what knowledge or experience you have that might be valuable or enjoyable to someone else.

Compile your E-book over time with a clear outline and strategy, design it how you wish (I recommend using Canva which is free and easy), turn it into a .pdf and put it on Amazon or on your own blog/website (which I’ll talk about in a second).

Here are some great resources for further brainstorming:


***I would also recommend browsing Amazon’s Bestselling Ebooks. Pay attention to the list of categories under Kindle Ebooks to get ideas for what you could write about.


Passive Income Idea #2: Start A Niche Website / Blog


This is one strategy of mine that I’ve already seen start to pay off, despite being in the very beginning stages.

What is a niche website?
A niche website is a site that focuses on a target audience with common specific interests.

For example:

Honestly - most websites are niche websites, meaning they have identified a target audience and strategize how to provide content to attract that target audience.

This website that you’re on right now, mine, is a niche website. Target audience: homesteaders (fortunately that includes a large array of topics that can be covered - good for me since I have a ton of topics I enjoy writing about!).


How To Monetize A Niche Website / Blog?


There are several different strategies you can use:

  • Affiliate links - these are just links you share on your site and when a visitor to your site clicks a link and ends up making a purchase from the site you’re an affiliate with (Amazon, RStyle, Carhartt, the list goes on and on and on, but most people begin with Amazon), you get a small commission. The commission is tiny - about 3 to 4 percent so the goal is to get a lot of click-throughs and purchases so that your affiliate income grows and grows. How do you get more click-throughs? More traffic to your site. How do you get more traffic to your site? By creating more and more quality content (blogging).

  • Digital Products - It could be Ebooks like we just talked about, online courses, etc.

  • Ads - I don’t use ads, so I can’t speak much on them, but many people rely on ads for a big chunk of their monthly passive income from their niche website.


So no matter what your current situation is, these are all ideas you can begin working on right now.

You might not see financial results until next year, but guess what? Next year will be here before you know it, so why not make steps in the direction of your goals?

I work a full-time job, but here I am, on a Sunday afternoon, creating a blog post which is a single little brick in the passive income house I’m working to build, if you will. I’d much rather be outside doing something away from the computer, but I know that this is work that must be done now so that eventually I do get my time back. (Plus, I really enjoy working on this website so that sure does help!).


I once heard success defined as being anytime you take an action that contributes to your goals. So, success isn’t just in achieving the goal, but in every single small step you take toward it.

Let me know in the comments below if you have any questions - I’m more than happy to help!

 

Welcome!


TIffany Davidson passive income, passive income ideas 2018, passive income strategies, how to create passive income with no money, how to start a homestead, how to begin homesteading

My husband and I are working to build a Nordic-inspired homestead in the Washington wilderness slowly with cash and no debt. You can follow the journey here!

I write about:

  • wilderness living

  • our homestead journey

  • health & wellness

  • adventure travel

  • cozy homemaking

  • wild food foraging

  • DIY & craft projects

  • making a living online from home (or anywhere)

  • natural living

  • my own recipes from scratch

  • and much more


My hope is that you will find some nugget of inspiration here.
Thank you so much for stopping in & please come back often. The kettle's always on...

x Tiffany


INSTAGRAM:

Disclosure: This website uses affiliate links, meaning: at no additional cost to you, we earn a small commission if you click-through and make a purchase. We only feature products that we believe in and use ourselves. Your support means the world to us and allows us to host this website.
So thank you :)


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20 Great Gift Ideas For Healthy Eaters (2019)
 

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I’ve been told over the years that my kitchen:

1.) “smells like a health food store” and
2.) “resembles a laboratory

…with contraptions big and small ready to whip up nourishing concoctions several times a day.

So I think I can help you out with an idea or two (or twenty!) about what to get the healthy eater in your life that will make their time in the kitchen even more creative and enjoyable.


GIFT IDEAS FOR HEALTHY EATERS


Like many of you, I’ve used a crockpot for decades. What I didn’t know? That conventional crockpots have been found to leech LEAD into the food. Lead is a heavy metal that can cause some pretty serious neurological problems, so as soon as I found out, I went looking for a solution.

Vitaclay is that solution. These are clay crockpots (stainless steel exterior, organic clay interior) and are safe and non-toxic and the material humans have been using to cook food for thousands of years.

(Oh! And you can find a whole shop of beautiful Ancient Cookware here, if you’re into that kind of thing!).


I love growing broccoli sprouts, but you can grow any kind of sprout with this hemp bag.

Higher-quality than buying them at the grocery, and cheaper too! Easy to use - just soak the sprouts and hang in the window or on a cabinet.

Check out The Easiest Way To Grow Your Own Broccoli Sprouts In A Bag (For Depression, Brain Health, Cancer Prevention, Anti-Aging, & More.


The centerpiece of any healthy eaters kitchen - an inspiring place to chop all those veggies!

I love live edge wooden cutting boards - they’re gorgeous and natural, solid and durable, with plenty of space, and they look lovely just sitting on the counter when not in use. I’ve had the same wooden cutting board for years and I really recommend this olive wood live edge board. (Doubles as a charcuterie!).


Any kombucha drinker knows that it costs a pretty penny to get all those good probiotics into the digestive tract by tasty fizzy means… so, it’s time to level up and brew your own!

This kit includes everything you need to brew your own, making the possibilities endless. You can make your own flavor! I think I would make a grape kombucha, ooh and a fenugreek kombucha…!

This is sure to be a hit for the recipient.


Your healthy eating loved one surely knows the value of sea salt for providing essential trace minerals… and a salt rock is the least processed form of sea salt available.

This set comes with a grater and definitely ups the posh factor of a kitchen!


Organic teas pressed into cute little shapes and ready to be dissolved in hot water, eliminating the need for tea bags or sweetener packets. Brilliant, really.


A BPA-free water bottle, with a fruit chamber so you can infuse all kinds of vitamins, minerals, and taste into your water. Hmm… I think I would try blueberry and basil, or strawberry and mint… yummm!


Far more comfortable than a standard apron, with more of an earthy artistic flair as opposed to a 1950’s housewife style.

Linen and cotton - you can’t really go wrong. Available in several earth tone colors.


Gut health is so important for all other aspects of health and fermented foods are a great way to get probiotics —those good bacteria— into the body.

This fermenting crock features the traditional design used for centuries to make sauerkraut, kimchi, pickles, and other fermented vegetables. Complete wth pounder and weights!

I have this very same jar in white - a gift from a friend that I still cherish to this day.


As an herbal tea enthusiast, my teapot is an essential and cherished item in my kitchen.

I love all things Le Creuset and especially their teapot selection.

Their stainless steel teapots are heavy-duty and available in their signature array of colors!


Healthy Reads

I wanted to include a few good books for you to choose from, and I’ve made sure to select ones that don’t rely on any specific diet to be enjoyed and appreciated.

Eating on the Wild Side: The Missing Link To Optimum Health -
The next stage in the food revolution--a radical way to select fruits and vegetables and reclaim the flavor and nutrients we've lost.

The Jungle Effect: Healthiest Diets from Around the World-Why They Work and How to Make Them Work for You - Whether it's the heart-healthy Cretan diet, with its reliance on olive oil and fresh vegetables, the antidepressive Icelandic diet and its extremely high levels of omega-3s, the age-defying Okinawa diet and its emphasis on vegetables and fish, or the other diets explored herein, everyone who reads this book will come away with the secrets of a longer, healthier life and the recipes necessary to put those secrets into action.

Eat to Live: The Amazing Nutrient-Rich Program for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss - This is a book that will let you live longer, reduce your need for medications, and improve your health dramatically. It is a book that will change the way you want to eat.  New recipes and menus included.

Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and Diet Dictocrats - My favorite cookbook to this day, full of traditional wisdom gleaned over the centuries (long before chronic diseases became as prevalent as they are today).


The most reputable home water filtration system - gravity fed and requires no power (wonderful for us off-grid folk!). Filters out bacteria and other contaminants while retaining essential minerals.

Can be used daily for clean water and is absolutely vital in any kind of emergency where the water supply is cut off and/or contaminated.

The higher price point makes these filters a highly coveted kitchen essential in the health community.


Us health nuts are picky about our materials - plastic utensils and hot food do not go together, so wooden utensils it is!

I’ve found bamboo to be durable and resistant to cracking (and wooden kitchen items just make things more beautiful overall!).


This is a vegan gift basket, but any health-oriented person will appreciate and devour it, vegan or not.

Pro tip: This basket would likely be highly appreciated during the holidays - the hardest time to maintain a healthy diet.






I almost bought into the Vitamix [blender] hype a few years ago (those things are over $500! they must be good, right?!). Then I read that small pieces of Teflon were coming off of Vitamix blenders and getting into people’s smoothies (so much for organic and healthy!?).

Then, I used a friends Vitamix and was less than impressed.

The blender I love and have used for years is this Ninja Professional Countertop Blender (1/5th the price of a Vitamix).

And if you cook a lot - you have to have a good blender, otherwise it’s just a source of frustration.


Because regular noodles are a thing of the past.

Nowadays, we health conscious folks make our noodles from squash and beets, and to do this you’ve got to have a good spiralizer!

This one even comes with some recipes…




Whole Foods Gift Cards (in a gift box!)

This is your fail-safe. Believe me, this gift will make them happy!

It makes me happy just thinking about it!

Hot bar, salad bar, a healthy dessert from the bakery, maybe some self-care spa item or those really nice health elixirs that just aren’t practical to buy yourself, a whole growler of kombucha, the options are nearly endless…


Your health conscious friend would probably love to replace all of their plasticware with wooden and stainless steel kitchenware, so help them out!

These wooden salad bowls are so beautiful, full of fresh colorful veggies.

Yum, now I’m craving a big ol’ salad…


Ok - I’m mostly putting this here because I wish someone would buy it for me :)

I’m a stickler about having good sharp knives in the kitchen. A good knife is an essential ingredient in an often used kitchen, otherwise the simple act of chopping veggies can become laborious and even dangerous.

This droolworthy knife set is German steel-forged and comes with a walnut block - the best combination for a kitchen knife set I can think of. Such a high-quality gift!


Le Creuset’s cookware is what every serious cook wants to line the shelves in her kitchen, but c’mon - $400 for a dutch oven?

I can’t justify it.

So - thank goodness Lodge makes enameled cast iron dutch ovens for a fraction of that price. With all the fun color options, too!


Okay, those are all my recommendations! Hopefully this helped you out and if nothing else - gave you some ideas and direction. Let me know if you have any questions at all.

Happy gift giving!

Until next time,

x
Tiffany


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Welcome!

TIffany+Davidson+Washingtons+Last+Frontier+Wilderness+Living+Homesteading+Hygge+Blog+Inspiring+Beautiful+Blog+Life+in+Washington+Homesteading+Off+grid.png

My husband and I are working to build a Nordic-inspired homestead in the Washington wilderness slowly with cash and no debt. You can follow the journey here!

I write about:

  • wilderness living

  • our homestead journey

  • health & wellness

  • adventure travel

  • cozy homemaking

  • wild food foraging

  • DIY & craft projects

  • making a living online from home (or anywhere)

  • natural living

  • my own recipes from scratch

  • and much more


My hope is that you will find some nugget of inspiration here.
Thank you so much for stopping in & please come back often. The kettle's always on...

x Tiffany


INSTAGRAM:


Disclosure: This website uses affiliate links, meaning: at no additional cost to you, we earn a small commission if you click-through and make a purchase. We only feature products that we believe in and use ourselves. Your support means the world to us and allows us to host this website.
So thank you :)


YOU MIGHT ALSO ENJOY:


The Route We're Taking To Begin Homesteading With No Debt (& Our Progress So Far)
 
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It’s the first of October, and I figured probably time for an update since our last one!

The purpose of sharing these updates is to show glimpses into our homesteading journey, so that when someone visits this site years from now and sees us living on our land, working from home, with beautiful plants and animals and hand-built structures dotting the landscape, living the dream essentially, and all with no debt… they can go back and see the beginning, they can see the steps we made and the time that it all took.

Not only does this make things more realistic, but I think it could also help people brainstorm ways of accomplishing similar dreams for themselves.

SO WHAT HAVE WE ACCOMPLISHED SO FAR?

It was this time last year that we really started to get serious about things. At that point in time, all we knew was that we wanted to live in this very wild and remote place where we could enjoy the slow pace of life and the inspiring landscape. Since then, our plan has ripened and become more and more clear.

The lifestyle we’re working to create is so far from finished, it’s just in the beginning stages really, but we have made progress toward it and every single day we continue to inch a little closer.

Let’s take a look back at what we’ve accomplished in the last year toward our off-grid homesteading goals!



BEGAN NEW CAREER PATHS [SUCCESSFULLY] THAT ALLOW US TO LIVE WHERE WE WANT

It was around this time last year, having just returned from the wilderness of northeast Washington (where we now live), that I sat in a coffee shop in a little town in Kentucky wondering how in the world I would ever be able to live in that remote wilderness that I loved so dearly full-time. How could I really make a life there, and a good life at that? With three people per square mile, jobs are few and far between.

I had no idea that just a couple of months later, I’d be making a full-time income online. It’s amazing what could be around the next corner if we’re willing to give it our all. You really just never know…

Read more about how I self-educated to be able to work online from anywhere here. I’m slowly working on an Ebook that will outline the details of exactly how I made this happen, so sign up for the newsletter to make sure you don’t miss out when I publish it.

Here’s a little coffee shop I found just north of here in Canada a few weeks ago where I can go get some work done when I need a change of scenery.

Here’s a little coffee shop I found just north of here in Canada a few weeks ago where I can go get some work done when I need a change of scenery.

The September view from my desk. What a difference a year can make!

The September view from my desk. What a difference a year can make!

 

A few months later, in January of this year, Eric decided that getting his CDL would be the best (and quickest) way to be able to live and homestead in a remote area. The few jobs that do come available out here often require a CDL, and at worst he could always go over the road then return here on days off.

He signed up for a really reputable CDL school which ended up being only a few miles from my father’s home in Wisconsin, ironically, and in February of 2018 we transitioned there for a few months while he completed the schooling and training.

Now he works for a wonderful local company and has probably one of the most beautiful routes that a truck driver could have - driving through the beautiful Washington and British Columbia mountains all day, then returning home to me each evening. We expected he would have to go over the road and we wouldn’t see each other for weeks at a time, but things worked out in the very best way they could have.

Does he want to be a truck driver forever? Of course not. Eventually, Eric plans to write music again and to hone a craft— he’s especially drawn to woodworking and blacksmithing— and turn those things into his full-time work. But, for now, our lines of work allow us great freedom to live where we want while making lucrative enough incomes to save for buying land and building a homestead in the near future.

Check out my blog post How To Make A Full-Time Income From Your Off-Grid Homestead for some more ideas to help your brainstorming.



RELOCATED OURSELVES & ALL OF OUR BELONGINGS TO THE AREA WE PLAN TO HOMESTEAD

For us, this meant going across the country, from the South to the Northwest. We moved 2,300 miles away!

This was a big move and took a lot of planning and preparing on our part, all while beginning entirely new career paths.

Living for a full year in an area before buying land in it is very important - I realize this now more than ever.

The specific places we now know we want to buy land near have evolved since we’ve been here and we’ve met local people who tell us about certain areas and point us in the direction of land for sale that is not listed on the Internet.

So moving here was essential, even though we aren’t yet ready to buy land or start building.

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ARRANGED A LIVING SITUATION

At the beginning of summer, I wrote an update to let you all know about our current setup. We’re still in that same setup and plan to stay in it until we’re ready to start building.

It is essentially an RV on our friends property that they’re letting us stay in as a kind of work-trade, and out of the simple goodness of their hearts.

We’ve been tempted many times this summer just to rent our own place, but were able to talk ourselves out of it each time remembering that all of the money we would put toward rent could be put into our little savings box instead! Besides, actually finding a rental home out here is… not realistic.

I have to say that one of the biggest sacrifices we’ve made throughout this whole journey so far is not having our own place - we both miss it terribly and long to have our things and our aloneness and more space. But this is a crucial part of the journey to having our own homestead — saving money! So, if it doesn’t contribute to that goal, we try to steer away from it.


WINTERIZED OUR LIVING QUARTERS

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We just finished winterizing the RV, using strawbales, and we still have to purchase a few hundred dollars worth of supplies to insulate the water hoses. This winter might be a little difficult - living in an RV with paper thin walls in a climate that sits under feet of snow for six solid months. Our biggest concern is the above-groud external water source…but we’ll see how it goes!

Again, sacrifices like this might have to be made while you work to save enough money to buy land outright and build your own house, which is what we plan to do within the year!



ACQUIRED HUNTING & FISHING LICENSES

This will help cut down on food costs while familiarizing us more and more intimately with the landscape.

In fact, as I type this, my husband is out with a friend hunting deer and grouse! After working sixty hours this past week, and not getting in bed until after 11 last night, he was up at 4AM to go hunt. Let’s hope it’s fruitful!

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WHAT’S NEXT?

Here’s our to-do list between now and next Spring:

  • Sell the 2wd Honda Element

  • Purchase two 4wd vehicles (one rugged truck and one that is better-suited for travel)

  • Save money! This means working a lot and minimizing expenses as much as possible

  • Start milling lumber to build the house with (this will require buying an Alaskan sawmill & appropriate chainsaw)

  • Find land

  • Build a small livable cabin so we can transition full-time to the homestead!


    It might not sound like a lot, but these are pretty great feats. The route we’re taking —to build a homestead slowly with cash— requires a lot of time and patience before the rewarding payoffs start trickling in. Once this list is completed, we will have a home (with no debt or monthly payment!) and land to build sustainable systems on that will feed and nourish us in all kinds of ways. From there, we can install off-grid power systems, huge gardens, build more structures for personal shops and studios, and just have fun with it!


SO YOU WANT TO BEGIN HOMESTEADING BUT AREN’T SURE WHERE TO START?

I would suggest doing the following:

  1. Figure out the area you want to live long-term on your off-grid homestead

  2. If work options aren’t available in that area, or you want to be able to work from home, start researching how to make a full-time income from your homestead. I’m not talking about filling out surveys and making a little here and there, I’m talking about self-educating and really skilling up, then beginning to do work for people, thereby building a portfolio slowly, and taking it from there. I managed to do this in under a year, and so can you. Check out:
    Self-Educating To Be Able To Work From Anywhere and How To Make A Full-Time Income From Your Off-Grid Homestead

  3. Minimize expenses and save money - if you don’t have a budget and you live paycheck to paycheck, you’ve got to do better. Sorry. Even if it’s $20/week, you can do without something and put that money back. Saving $1,000/year is better than zero. Going through life with no budget, making impulsive buys for short-term dopamine release, will not get you anywhere. Sit down and list out your monthly expenses (including bills of course but also food, gas, miscellaneous things that tend to come up, etc.), then subtract that from your monthly income. Whatever is left is what should be going into a Savings envelope. Seven months from now, you might come across acreage for sale with owner financing available but they want $1,500 down. Budgeting and saving now could be the difference in whether or not you can buy that land then.


A goal this big doesn’t happen overnight (which is why most people have 30-year mortgages). But it can happen in a year or two, and debt-free, if you start educating yourself now and outlining a solid plan of action.

If you have any questions at all, please don’t hesitate to leave them in the comments below. I’m more than happy to help in any way I can. We’re all on this path together, after all.

Until next time ~

x
Tiffany


 

Welcome!


TIffany+Davidson+Washingtons+Last+Frontier+Wilderness+Living+Homesteading+Hygge+Blog+Inspiring+Beautiful+Blog+Life+in+Washington+Homesteading+Off+grid.png

My husband and I are working to build a Nordic-inspired homestead in the Washington wilderness slowly with cash and no debt. You can follow the journey here!

I write about:

  • wilderness living

  • our homestead journey

  • health & wellness

  • adventure travel

  • cozy homemaking

  • wild food foraging

  • DIY & craft projects

  • making a living online from home (or anywhere)

  • natural living

  • my own recipes from scratch

  • and much more


My hope is that you will find some nugget of inspiration here.
Thank you so much for stopping in & please come back often. The kettle's always on...

x Tiffany


INSTAGRAM:

Disclosure: This website uses affiliate links, meaning: at no additional cost to you, we earn a small commission if you click-through and make a purchase. We only feature products that we believe in and use ourselves. Your support means the world to us and allows us to host this website.
So thank you :)


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